Innovation Grant Table

 

Project Project Info Budget Info Applicant(s) Submitted
An Online Biomedical Informatics & Data Science Graduate Certificate Program
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

Goal: The major goal of our Program Development & Innovations Grant application is to develop a fully online Graduate Certificate Program in Biomedical Informatics & Data Science, an area of signature UD strength that will be of interest to mid-career working professionals regionally, nationally, and globally. The online program will further develop our Bioinformatics Data Science Core Curriculum, building on the success of the Bioinformatics Master’s programs (MS in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, PSM in Bioinformatics, and Graduate Certificate in Bioinformatics) established in 2010 and PhD program in Bioinformatics & Systems Biology in 2012 and renamed in 2019 to Bioinformatics Data Science—a cross-campus interdisciplinary graduate program with a current enrollment of about 60 students.

The Bioinformatics Data Science Core Curriculum provides core competency in Bioinformatics and Data Science, two rapidly expanding fields of study with applications ranging from genomics to pharmaceutical, health informatics, and biomedical research; having the potential to impact all areas of scientific research. The curriculum is ideally suited for working professionals or as a complement to other UD degree programs (as students in the Certificate program may be enrolled in other UD graduate programs across colleges), allowing students to gain data science knowledge and skills.

A fully online Graduate Certificate Program in Biomedical Informatics & Data Science will allow us to better serve the needs of working professionals, addressing the main barrier in their ability to attend classes during normal working hours, while increasing enrollment to these classes and to our program.

The development of new online courses in Biomedical Informatics & Data Science will further enable our faculty to enhance high-impact experiential learning, coupling lecture-based instructions with hands-on exercises and term projects with both team-based as well as individual e-learning. In particular, we will engage team-teaching with research colleagues at Georgetown University, Christiana Care Health Systems, and Fox Chase Cancer Center (as UD adjunct faculty) to provide state-of-the-art course contents along with cutting-edge technologies and research applications.

Deliverables: The deliverables will be the completion of two (3-credit) and one elective (1-credit) course for the development of 7 total credit hours. Two additional core courses offered from the Bioinformatics Data Science Core (3-credits each) will constitute the course curriculum for the fully online Biomedical Informatics & Data Science Certificate program for launching in Fall 2019. Each new course will be developed and submitted to the 2019-2020 Supplemental Course Listing.

Timeline:

Project start date – July 1 2019 for one year, ending June 30, 2020. Online course development will begin immediately for a Fall 2019 launch of our first online course, Applied Machine Learning, and continue course development of Biomedical Informatics and Data Science to be taught Spring 2020.

Importance:

A fully online Graduate Certificate Program will allow us to better serve the needs of working professionals who often cite their inability to attend classes during normal working hours as the main barrier to graduate school enrollment. As such, we receive frequent inquiries (2-3x/month) for distance learning options from prospective students. The enrollment potential is quite strong for this program. It is clear there are not enough data science professionals to meet the high demand. And while there has been a growing number of biomedical informatics related programs launched throughout the United States, there are still relatively few online options.

Target Audience:

The primary target audience is regional and national professionals working in fields such as biomedicine, precision medicine, health informatics, and data science. Data science may well be the single fastest-growing specialty in the sciences, according to many accredited scientific and industry reviews. Numerous federal granting agencies have identified the important role of data science in the 21st century. It is emerging as a field that is revolutionizing science and industries alike. This certificate program will help meet industry’s demand for professionals who have the ability to interpret complex biomedical data through their knowledge of informatics methods, tools and/or databases.

Total:
Excel
Justification:
Supporting Documentaiton
Karen Hoober, Assistant Director, Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology
Lead Organizer
CBCB
Cathy Wu, Director, Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology
Co-Organizer
CBCB
6/28/19
Neuroscience Seminar Series
Professional Development
Description:

Here, I propose to fund a speaker series that will bring in 6 outside speakers to give a talk and lead a “journal club” to discuss recent findings in the field with graduate students in our department. Graduate students will play an instrumental role in deciding which speakers to invite. Students will each have an opportunity to have lunch with the speaker of their choice.

Timeline:

There will be 6 speakers coming in, once per month from September 2019 through April 2020.

Importance:

An important component of professional development for graduate students is networking with scientists in their field of study. One ideal way to provide this opportunity is to have a departmental speaker series.  

Target Audience:

Graduate students and postdocs in the Psychological and Brain Sciences department.

Total:
Excel
Justification:
Amy Griffin, Associate Professor
Lead Organizer
Psychological and Brain Sciences
7/26/19
TU+5: 5th workshop on Turkic and languages in contact with Turkic
Professional Development
Description:

The Linguistics Association of Delaware, a registered graduate student organization that represents the students in the department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science, is organizing the hosting of TU+5. TU+5 is the 5th edition of TU+, an academic workshop on Turkic and languages in contact with Turkic.

 

Abstract submissions for 30 minute talks and for posters will be solicited on Liguistlist.org and by emailing participants from last year’s conference. 14 talks and 10 posters will be accepted. There will also be two invited speakers. Professor Öner Özçelik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Central Asian Studies and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Second Language Studies at the Indiana University. This is a link to his website: https://dsls.indiana.edu/faculty/ozcelik.html . Professor Arsalan Kahnemuyipour is Associate Professor in the Department of Language Studies at The University of Toronto Mississauga. This is a link to his website: https://arsalank.com/ . Based on previous editions of TU$+$, it is expected that there will be approximately 50 attendees.

 

After the workshop finishes, talks and posters will be submitted as papers by their authors and the proceedings of the workshop will be published by the Linguistic Society of America, the largest national professional society for linguistics, allowing contributions to the field that were made during the workshop to reach a wider audience.

 

This event will be planned and executed by University of Delaware graduate students. Abstract submissions for 20 minute talks and for posters will be peer-reviewed by UD graduate students. This will give UD graduate students practical training in peer-review, an important service activity within the academic community. Because the conference will be at UD, UD graduate students will have the opportunity to meet faculty and graduate students from departments around the country and world for the purposes of networking, mentorship, or collaboration. UD graduate students will also be the editors of the TU$+$ proceedings, giving them training in another important service activity.

Timeline:

The workshop will be held on February 8th and 9th 2020 in either Trabant or Perkins. Following in the tradition of previous editions of TU+, there will be a dinner on the evening of February 8th in the department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science. The invited speakers will arrive on the afternoon of February 7th and leave the evening of February 9th.

Importance:

TU+ is the only academic venue that is specific to Turkic languages and languages in contact with Turkic, making it the best venue for scholars focused on these languages to present their work.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this conference is graduate students and faculty at UD and throughout the national and international linguistics community, especially those that work on Turkic languages and languages in contact with Turkic.

Total:
Excel
Justification:
Larson Stromdahl, Mr.
Co-Organizer
Linguistics and Cognitive Science
Bilge Palaz, Ms.
Co-Organizer
Linguistics and Cognitive Science
9/3/19
Bill Anderson Fund Flagship: BAF@UD 4.0 Workshop
Professional Development
Description:

The Bill Anderson Fund (fondly known as “BAF”) was established in 2014. The non-profit, founded in memory of pioneering disaster studies researcher William (Bill) A. Anderson and dedicated to his goal of improving diversity in the field, announced in 2017 that it would make the University of Delaware (“UD”) its home.  UD and BAF representatives formalized the Fund’s Flagship designation in 2018. This fall, UD will host the fourth annual (BAF@UD 4.0) Workshop on campus in collaboration with the Disaster Research Center (“DRC”). This request is to support the operations and programming for the workshop. It will be composed of returning BAF Fellows as well as a large cohort of new Fellows.

The BAF provides ongoing programmatic offerings as part of its mission to facilitate a successful graduate school experience for students from historically underrepresented groups pursuing terminal degrees in the fields of hazard and disaster science and practice. This year’s workshop will feature an array of informative sessions, providing an opportunity to hear from leading experts and faculty in the disaster field. Fellows will be invited to participate in breakouts designed in two tracks; one aimed at Fellows well into their degree programs, and the other focused on topics applicable to new and more junior students. 

The two-day agenda consists of professional development breakout sessions, panel presentations and roundtable discussions led by representatives from the private, non-profit, non-academic research, and government sectors to share their career path insights. They will provide direction to students interested in such career trajectories, as well as advice about  the opportunities and challenges in each career. Other session topics include: crafting interdisciplinary grant proposals, efficient planning of one’s time in graduate school; demystifying the academic search process; negotiating first employment after graduate school; and establishing school/life balance. In addition, Fellows will benefit from the workshop’s participatory approach and community building opportunities that round out the agenda for this ambitious program. 

Supporting the newly established Flagship’s workshop is an opportunity for the University to showcase DRC’s global reputation as a leader in the advancement of disaster knowledge, as well as promote UD’s recent dedication to expanding core faculty at DRC to include expert, multi-disciplined educators and researchers. It is also an opportunity to highlight the role of the BAF Flagship in diversifying the disaster and hazards field in the efforts to make communities safer, stronger and more resilient for vulnerable, underrepresented populations.

Timeline:

Visiting Fellows arrive on Thursday, October 10th. In all, 30 Fellows, the largest cohort in history, and over 18 distinguished speakers and faculty will unite on campus for two full day sessions, running on the 11th and 12th. Visiting Fellows will depart on Sunday, October 13th. The Disaster Research Center will contribute $1200 toward expenses, and provide in-kind support in the form of meeting space and materials.  Also, the College of Arts & Sciences and Department of Sociology have contributed $1000 and $250 respectively to support the workshop, and the Department of Engineering has pledged an additional $1000.

Importance:

Significant research shows that racial and ethnic minorities have increased difficulty evacuating prior to a crisis, experience disproportionate physical and financial loss during disasters, and have more difficulty recovering from these events. By diversifying the field of scholars and practitioners, the Flagship hopes to diversity the approach to addressing these disparities. The Workshop promotes professional development and completion of degree programs by focusing on specific benchmarks that are proven stumbling blocks for students pursuing advanced degrees. It is an essential resource for Fellows to broaden their perspectives, learn of emerging research, assess their intellectual growth within the field, and identify potential employers or post-doctoral mentors.

Target Audience:

The target workshop audience is the 30 participating BAF Fellows who are all PhD students at varying levels of completion of their degrees. The Fellows, including five University of Delaware students, represent 18 institutions nationwide and participate in a variety of disciplines of disaster science, including, but not limited to: civil and environmental engineering, sociology, criminal justice, urban planning and development, emergency management, public policy and administration, epidemiology, forestry, and architecture. Nearly 20 esteemed speakers are confirmed to participate, including UD faculty, disaster practitioners, elected officials, governmental and non-profit sector leaders.

Total:
Excel
Justification:
Monica Sanders, Director

Bill Anderson Fund Flagship
9/11/19
Understanding and Improving the Quality of Mental Health Resources for International Graduate Students at the University of Delaware
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

The University of Delaware is home to 1,250 graduate-level international students. The majority of these international graduate students come to UD from countries in Asia. In addition to typical academic challenges in the collegiate environment, international students face challenges in leaving a familiar environment and studying at a university abroad. These challenges include difficulties with acculturation to a new culture and the expectations of the environment, language barriers and difficulties, and issues of social adjustment and loneliness. Preliminary research data conducted by faculty and staff at UD has found that international students on UD’s campus suffer from high rates of anxiety and depression symptoms, and report experiencing discrimination and difficulties with acculturation (Shadowen, Williamson, Guerra, Ammigan, & Drexler, 2019). The proposed project aims to evaluate and improve student mental health services for the graduate-level international student population at the University of Delaware. The project collaborators include the Office for International Students and Scholars (OISS), the Center for Training, Evaluation, and Community Collaboration (C-TECC) within the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, the Center for Counseling and Student Development (CCSD), the office of Student Wellness and Health Promotion, and the Psychological Services Training Center (PSTC).

The project aims to better understand and provide culturally informed evidence-based mental health practices on campus. C-TECC would conduct a Needs Assessment of current services, gaps in services, and the most urgent mental health needs for students. Included will be quantitative and qualitative evaluation for current and former international graduate students, which will inform the planning of mental health programming for students. All stakeholders will receive results in the form of a report, and will collaborate regarding next steps. We anticipate that the needs evaluation could inform projects such as systems where incoming international students are paired with “mentor” alumni in their academic area, student support groups that may address areas most urgent to students, screening and referrals for mental health difficulties and treatment, or other ways of linking international student peers for needed support.

Based upon the results of the needs assessment, we anticipate that a second year will involve the development of an innovative toolkit of appropriate services and strategies and the piloting of potential new programs and supports for international students on campus, along with an evaluation of outcomes from these new programs.

Timeline:

Months 0-9: CTECC will collaborate with appropriate offices to complete a comprehensive Needs Assessment, including conducting interviews with key informants from OISS, CCSD, Student Wellness, and international students. CTECC will provide feedback to stakeholders.

Months 10-12: CTECC will develop a formal report based on results of the needs assessment, which will be shared with all stakeholders. CTECC will lead collaboration about appropriate next steps and possibilities in terms of service and program development.

Importance:

The project would allow UD to tailor mental health services to be informed by evidence-based mental health practices for Asian international students. This high-impact program would provide a foundation for success for the growing international student population and bolster UD’s reputation as a supportive environment for talented international students. It also will provide important learning in cultural sensitivity and needs for key UD support offices. We will submit the final report to the ACE Internationalization Laboratory at UD as part of the effort to create an action plan for advancing mental health services for international students on campus

Target Audience:

This program will serve UD’s graduate-level international students, particularly the large population of students from Asian countries. A recent article published in the Journal of International Students (Shadowen, Williamson, Guerra, Ammigan, & Drexler, 2019) established that almost 40% of the international graduate student population at UD met clinical cutoff criteria on a screening measure for depression, and over 15% screened positively for anxiety symptoms. Acculturative stress and perceived discrimination were strongly correlated with these negative outcomes. Asian international students suffered disproportionately from symptoms of anxiety and depression, and therefore may benefit most from the proposed program.

Total:
Excel
Justification:
Supporting Documentaiton
Ryan Beveridge, Associate Professor, Director of Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program

Psychological and Brain Sciences
9/12/19
Brown bag discussion with Prof. Barbara Sherwood Lollar
Professional Development
Description:

Prof. Barbara Sherwood Lollar is visiting UD to deliver a seminar for the Microbiology Graduate Program. She has agreed to also participate in a brown bag lunch with graduate students to discuss careers. Prof. Sherwood Lollar is an exceptional role model whose list of accomplishments include being a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a Companion of the Order of Canada. She has won numerous awards for her scientific accomplishments and is a thought leader in the areas of Geomicrobiology and Astrobiology.  She also collaborates with Chemours and has trained many leading industrial environmental scientists in Canada. She is also recognized as a champion for equity and equality. She delivered the keynote address at the 2019 Gairdner/L’Oreal UNESCO Forum on Diversity and Excellence in Science.

Funds will be used to provide lunch for a brown bag discussion of careers in science. In order to ensure that there is an opportunity for two-way discussion and exchange, total attendance will be capped at 30-40 graduate students by RSVP on a first come first serve basis.

Timeline:

The lunch will occur on Oct. 17th at DBI.

Importance:

Prof. Sherwood Lollar is an exceptional role model whose list of accomplishments include being a Fellow of the Royal Society, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Target Audience:

Target audience is STEM graduate students, though all will be welcome to attend.

Total:
Excel
Justification: The budget will be entirely dedicate to the purchase of food for the event. The estimate is a maximum value and may be less if fewer than the expected number of attendees reserve.
Supporting Documentaiton
Thomas Hanson, Professor

SMSP and DBI
10/3/19
Launching the Engineering and Public Policy PhD Program
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

The Engineering and Public Policy (EPP) PhD program was approved in May 2019 and we are recruiting our first cohort of students for Fall 2020.  This interdisciplinary program builds on the interests and strengths of faculty in Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Biden School of Public Policy and Administration. We are proposing two key activities to launch the program.

The first activity is a targeted social media campaign that is intended to gain visibility to the program outside of UD.  This idea grew out of discussion with Steve Kendus who identified marketing success using social media for other interdisciplinary programs.  He has indicated that he is willing to assist us to define the relevant parameters.  We have also worked with COE Communications to ensure that we have relevant landing pages from the ads.  This effort is intended to be complementary to targeted mailings for EPP and a newly launched initiative to ensure a presence as some important conference focused on graduate recruiting more generally for Civil and Environmental Engineering.

The second activity is a mini-symposium. Our objective is to generate a buzz around the program both within and outside UD.  The mini-symposium is slated for the afternoon of Friday November 22. After an introduction to the program, we will have lightning talks from about ten faculty with an interest in research topics related to engineering and public policy.  We will close out the formal part of the mini-symposium with a keynote by Professor Alain Kornhauser from Princeton University. Professor Kornhauser is a pioneer in Autonomous Vehicles and Personal Rapid Transit engaging in both technology and policy development.  He is an engaging speaker. The afternoon will end with a reception to encourage continued conversation.  Invitees include some potential graduate student applicants, existing graduate students with policy interests, faculty interested in technology/engineering/ applied science and policy, graduates from Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Biden School with interests in this area, and policy makers interested in hiring our graduates or offering practicums. We are anticipating about 30-50 attendees.  We plan to have a photographer present and to record the talks using UDCapture to illustrate research areas of interest to potential graduate students.

Timeline:

We expect the social media campaign to launch November 1, 2019. Allowing us almost 12 weeks before applications are due on January 15.

The mini-symposium is scheduled for the afternoon of November 22, 2019.  The keynote speaker is confirmed. The rooms have been reserved. We have five of the ten lightning talks lined up and have identified other potential speakers.  Invitations will go out by October 21st.

COE Communications will work to get a timely UDaily article about the mini-symposium and material will be added to the Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biden School webpages and social media presence.

Importance:

Recruiting for a new program is challenging.  Recruiting for a new interdisciplinary program is even more challenging.  We need to get the word out to attract students and faculty who might know of potential students to our webpages.  We need to generate content for these webpages. We will be able to use the photos for the event for promotional material, to point to the lightning talks as examples of relevant and current research interests of the faculty, and to identify faculty that have expressed interest in being affiliated with the program.

Target Audience:

Our audience is a network of policy and decision makers, faculty and students who will help us to promote the Engineering and Public Policy Program at University of Delaware and help us recruit our first cohort and then subsequent cohorts of PhD Students.  While the mini-symposium is likely to engage this network locally and regionally, the content and related promotional materials will help us to engage a national and global network.

Total:
Excel
Justification: Note: 1) Civil and Environmental Engineering and College of Engineering will cover 50% of the costs; 2) Consulting – photographer to cover event $300; social media advertising $2500; 3) Equipment – UDCapture of talks 4) Mileage/Parking/Lodging included for Keynote speaker 5) Meals includes reception for attendees and dinner with three key participants with keynote speaker
Supporting Documentaiton
Sue McNeil, Professor and Chair
Lead Organizer
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Ardeshir Faghri, Professor and Program Director
Co-Organizer
Civil and Environmental Engineering
10/10/19
Minority Mentor Lecture Series (MMLS)
Professional Development
Description:

The department of Sociology and Criminal Justice annually hosts the Minority Mentor Lecture Series. MMLS was founded by a graduate student of color in the department 12 years ago and continues to be planned and run by graduate students year after year.

The purpose of the MMLS is to (1) showcase minority scholarship to the campus at-large and serve as a springboard for minority faculty recruitment and (2) establish and foster professional development and networking opportunities for underrepresented and isolated minority graduate students.

The speaker meets with the dean(s) of our college, the chair, and department faculty. This series includes an informal professional development workshop luncheon with graduate students from the department, where candid conversations regarding academic and professional experiences are discussed. The objective of scheduling this more intimate and casual session is to address graduate student concerns, offer useful advice, and provide students with an outside perspective from a scholar who has reconciled (or perhaps, is still confronting) many of the same hurdles. Additionally, this workshop seeks to raise awareness, sensitivity, and community-building among graduate students from all walks of life and privilege.  The speaker then delivers a formal lecture later that afternoon, to which all students, faculty, staff, and affiliated non-UD students and professionals or advocates are invited.  The lecture is generally cosponsored by the The Center for Black Culture and the Center for the Study of Diversity. The event looks very much like a 90-minute colloquium where the speaker presents their research and then conducts an open Q-and-A forum.  The lecture is then followed by a dinner or reception with the MMLS committee and several faculty from varied departments, research, and cultural centers. We like to schedule the event for a Friday during the Spring semester usually in early March, depending on which days work better with the speaker’s schedule.  We try to have the speaker come for the day or stay with us from Thursday evening until Saturday morning for maximum exposure.

We heavily advertise the event across campus, in the community, and to nearby colleges. We always have a good turnout of roughly 60 plus attendees and have been getting more and more each year.

Timeline:

October – Confirm speaker and dates for MMLS

November/December (no later than early January) – Confirm itinerary for event/ confirm venues for event (location of colloquium, location of intimate luncheon, location of dinner or reception, speaker stay accommodations, etc.)

November to February – Advertise event

March 19th – Speaker arrives

March 20th – MMLS

March 21st – Speaker leaves

 

Importance:

It is important to showcase minority scholarship and to have an ongoing avenue for minority faculty recruitment. Also, it is important to establish and foster professional development and networking opportunities for underrepresented and isolated minority graduate students. Though working on it, UD is not yet a hub of diversity amongst either students nor faculty. Representation matters. Thus, meeting and interacting with a person that has already achieved what graduate students of color are attempting to achieve makes the possibility of achieving a doctorate all the more tangible.

Target Audience:

UD campus, the greater community outside of UD (so that they are aware of our efforts), and nearby colleges (in hopes of potential recruitment).

Total:
Excel
Justification: MMLS is well established as this is our 12th year hosting the event. We are only asking that the Graduate College co-sponsor the event this year and thus are happy to accept the offered $2,000 suggested at our meeting October 22nd. Attached is the overall budget. The rest of the budget will come from our department and other co-sponsors (the Provost of Diversity and the Center for the Study of Diversity). Again, the importance of brining diversity to UD’s campus, showcasing minority scholarship, having an avenue for minority faculty recruitment, and the professional development and networking opportunities for underrepresented and isolated minority graduate students cannot be stressed enough.
Supporting Documentaiton
Chenesia Brown, Chair of MMLS
Lead Organizer
Sociology and Criminal Justice
10/24/19
Words For Nerds (Year II)
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

Last spring, engineering professor Dr. Joshua Zide and English professor Dawn Fallik developed “Words For Nerds,” a five-part workshop aimed at helping graduate students share their research with the public. It was a great success, with more than 92 students applying for 25 slots. We would like to offer the seminar again this spring.

Last year, we held seminars focusing on public advocacy, social media, media outreach and radio programming. Speakers included Gene Park, social media director for The Washington Post, Dr. Dara Kass, creator of FemInEM (emergency medicine), and Charles Bergquist, director for the “Science Friday” radio show and a UD chemistry alum.

Students learned about what makes something a good Tweet vs an Instagram post, how to pitch stories to the media and why sometimes good advocacy projects fail. We would invite Gene Park and Charles Bergquist back to campus. This year we would add Laura Helmuth, the science editor for The Washington Post (who wanted to
come last year but had a scheduling conflict) and John Duchneskie, the graphics editor for The Philadelphia Inquirer.

During the last gathering, students presented their research to a group of judges with STEM knowledge, including Dr. Doug Doren, the interim vice provost for professional and graduate education, Dr. Tina Hesman-Saey, a senior reporter for Science News who covers genetics, and Barbara Adde, a UD alum and strategic communications director for NASA.

The program was well received by the students, judging by a mid-semester survey. Eighteen students responded, and all of them said the program was enjoyable and a majority (15/18) said it was effective or very effective.
Two student suggestions stood out – they wanted longer sessions and they felt spreading the seminars over the semester caused them to forget the previous lessons. So we would extend the sessions from 4:30-7 instead of 5 to 7 p.m. and we would hold them weekly, starting after spring break (which seemed to be best for the speakers.)

Students also asked for an extra session to practice their presentations, as well as option of a technical session – such as practicing podcasting with a mic. So it would be a total of seven sessions. We would keep the dinner aspect, as both the students and the speakers said it gave them a chance to chat in a more relaxed atmosphere.

Timeline:

We would hold a weekly two-and-a-half hour sessions starting after spring break and ending the first week in June with a final presentation. Students would give an “elevator speech” about their research to alumni and faculty, and demonstrating how they might use social media, YouTube or podcasting to help them share their work.

This final session would be a capstone project open to the entire campus community.
The top student would win $500, with second prize at $300 and third at $200.

Importance:

Whether it’s vaccine information, climate change impact or technology privacy concerns, there is a demand for professionals who can communicate clearly to their patients, clients and general public. Part of the reason people increasingly distrust academic is that they are confused by the jargon, and they may not see it if they only get their information from one media platform, like Twitter. Researchers need to learn how to reach the general public on their educational level, and on popular platforms, such as Instagram and Twitter. Government agencies, graduate schools and private industry recognize this need. The National Science Foundation now requires grant applicants to specifically write for the public, explaining the nature and goals of their project. The Joint Commission, which accredits hospitals, included improving communication among caregivers as one of its top goals.

Target Audience:

We would specifically reach out to STEM students, as well as agriculture and business, but the workshops would be open to all fields. We would give preference to the students who could make all the workshops.

Total:
Excel
Justification: Because organization of this program requires a significant amount of Prof. Fallik’s time, we request $3,000 of supplemental salary to support her efforts. Additionally, we request eight hours of administrative support from the Graduate College with logistics for speakers, etc.
Supporting Documentaiton
Dawn Fallik, Associate Professor
Lead Organizer
English
Joshua Zide, Professor
Co-Organizer
Materials Engineering
12/11/19
Master Preceptor Preparation Initiative for the UD Athletic Training Education Program
Professional Development
Description:

UD’s Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) is transitioning from an undergraduate major to an entry-level Master of Science degree program beginning Summer 2019.  Accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), UD’s ATEP strictly adheres to the standards set forth by the commission in order to maintain accreditation.  Effective July 2020 are a new set of standards that will require UD’s clinical preceptors to be trained and competent with the skills and attributes necessary to effectively institute UD’s clinical education program.  Preceptors supervise and engage students in clinical education at venues here at UD and throughout the greater Wilmington, DE community.  Clinical education is a broad umbrella term that includes learning opportunities to prepare students for independent clinical practice.  CAATE Standard 45 states: “Preceptors are health care providers whose experience and qualifications include – planned and ongoing education for their role as a preceptor”.  Currently, UD ATEP uses a variety of in-house resources to orient/train our clinical preceptor staff, without an efficient way of monitoring effectiveness and compliance.  In anticipation of these new CAATE requirements for preceptor training, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) has teamed up with expert clinical educators to create an on-line Master Preceptor Training (MPT) program.  The MPT program is designed to provide opportunities for practicing clinicians who have an interest and passion for serving as preceptors to develop and advance expertise in clinical teaching.  Skills gained through completing these modules should serve to assist preceptors in effectively facilitating and supporting high-quality clinical learning experiences for athletic training students.  The MPT consists of four modules (The Clinical Education Experience, Developing Expertise as a Clinical Preceptor, Evaluating Learning Outcomes in the Clinical Education Setting, and The Informed Preceptor), each requiring 1.5 hr. of on-line interaction, along with 1 hour of outside assigned readings.  Each module concludes with a final assessment quiz to gauge learning and comprehension.  As our clinical preceptors successfully complete their on-line training, we would then implement our local program specific to the policies and procedures that govern the UD ATEP clinical education experience.  Additionally, as a nice adjunct to the on-line educational programming we are proposing to develop a ½ day workshop given by a prominent athletic training clinical educator to reinforce learned strategies/behaviors and enhance preceptor qualifications.   In light of this, UD’s ATEP would like to begin utilizing this training program as a way of incorporating uniformity and consistency in our preceptor education program and provide a more effective pathway of compliance and assessment monitoring.

Timeline:

A Summer 2020 timeline of implementation is anticipated in advance of our students beginning their clinical rotations in the Fall 2020 semester.  The workshop, as an ancillary part of the proposal, would be held in the Spring of 2021.

Importance:

UD’s ATEP is in a transitory period requiring us to handle the completion of undergraduate athletic training cohorts at the same time we begin incorporating educational opportunities for our incoming entry-level graduate students.  Clinical education will continue to be a cornerstone of our students’ educational process.  Insuring quality clinical experiences and opportunities for hands-on learning in clinical environments is an important aspect of our program moving forward; when combined with the forthcoming CAATE-accreditation mandates, is challenging UD’s ATEP to remain relevant.  At the nucleus of our clinical education program is our cadre of clinical preceptors, all of who need ongoing training and enhancements to allow UD athletic training students to receive the best possible educational experience while taking part in their required clinical rotations.  Those preceptors are the ones who stand to most benefit from this proposed grant proposal, secondarily our students will benefit from having preceptors appropriately trained and competent in providing quality clinical education, and thirdly, our program will reap the benefit from better-prepared students with solid clinical skill sets equipped to pass the BOC -certification examination on the first attempt.

Target Audience:

This grant proposal is written specifically for a targeted audience of BOC-certified athletic trainers (ATC) licensed to practice athletic training in the state in which they are employed, and willing to serve as preceptors in UD’s ATEP.  A fringe audience will include ATEP faculty, especially our Clinical Education Coordinator (CEC) who provides direct oversight of our clinical education program.

Total:
Excel
Justification: On-Line Training Professional Development Courses through the NATA $3600 Airfare – Workshop Speaker (PHL or BWI) $500.00 Lodging – Workshop Speaker (Courtyard by Marriott) $156.00 Honorarium – Workshop Speaker $500.00 Food – Workshop Speaker (City of Newark, DE per diem rate with ½ day travel on both ends) = $170.00 & Workshop Food for Attendees (75 attendees x $15 = $1,125.00) $1295.00 Airport Parking – Workshop Speaker $35.00
Supporting Documentaiton
Thomas Kaminski, Professor/Director of Athletic Training Education
Lead Organizer
KAAP
2/16/20
Robotics Innovation Challenge: a unique student curriculum addition to the Master of Science in Robotics program
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

The University of Delaware is committed to increasing and disseminating scientific, humanistic and social knowledge for the benefit of the larger society. A new Master of Science in Robotics (MSR) program was established in Fall 2019 in the University of Delaware with the aim to align and support the mission of the University by disseminating cutting-edge scientific knowledge in an interdisciplinary field of significance to the broader U.S. economy, and educate a specialized work-force that is expected to be responsive to current and near-future national and global employment trends. Although the very promising first year of the program (approx. 30 applications by mid-February 2020, for the Fall 2020 semester), the program needs to stand out among many other programs in robotics in the East Coast and across the US that are being established in an increasing rate. This proposal aims to create a semester-long robotics innovation challenge that will culminate with a bootcamp event, which will include a robotic deployment and testing on the field. The unique UD campus-wide facilities, expertise, and existing faculty collaborations with industry and government allow for the students to be exposed to several aspects of implementation and utilization of robotic systems in air, land, and sea. Leveraging those strengths, this proposal aims to provide a formal, credit-eligible, hands-on experience to the students in the MSR program, who will be able to apply knowledge gained through the strong curriculum to the development, programming, and deployment of robotic systems to tackle real-life scenarios and challenges. Those challenges will be defined by a committee formed by experts from local industry, government and UD faculty and will specifically address industry and society needs. Indicative examples include search and rescue missions by autonomous ground and/or aerial vehicles, disaster response, agricultural monitoring, water sampling, etc. Injecting this innovation challenge into the current MSR curriculum can transform the program and make it unique in the nation, by not only allowing the students to have direct exposure to the applications of robotics systems in society, but also by bringing them with direct communication with their future employers. The proposed innovation challenge can, therefore, make the MSR program in UD highly competitive, which will lead to significantly boosting the enrollment level of the program, tuition revenues, and most importantly, student success. Moreover, the proposed innovation challenge catalyzes and enhances the partnership of the university with the industry and local government.

Timeline:

Funding is requested to launch the Innovation Challenge in the Spring 2021 semester, with the bootcamp event taking place in early June 2021. This will allow the first cohort of MSR students that will graduate in Spring 2021 to take advantage of this unique experience. We expect the existing university-industry liaisons, as well as the many new ones that will be created, will ensure the sustainability of the program. Specifically, we expect the sought funds will spark the interest of big industry partners (e.g. Boeing, Nvidia, Siemens, Agriculture and Chemical industry), who will sponsor the program in the following years.

Importance:

Although the very promising first year of the program, the program needs to stand out among many other programs in robotics in the East coast and across the US that are being established in an increasing rate. Introducing the proposed innovation challenge into the current MSR curriculum can transform the program and make it unique in the nation, by not only allowing the students to have a direct exposure to the applications of robotics systems in society, but also bringing them with direct communication with their future employers that set the requirements of those challenges.

Target Audience:

The International Data Corporation (IDC) report predicts that “by 2020, robotics growth will accelerate the talent race, leaving 35% of robotics related jobs vacant while the average salary increases by at least 60%”, while “worldwide spending on robotics systems forecast to reach $128.7 billion in 2020”. The proposed innovation challenge addition to the MSR program targets potential graduate students that would be attracted to UD because of this unique feature that is currently unavailable in other programs. Although the majority of applicants are international, we expect that this unique opportunity will also attract a significant percentage of domestic students.

Total:
Excel
Justification: Funding is requested for equipment, materials and software necessary for the development, programming and deployment of robotic platforms (ground and/or aerial robots) throughout the challenge and the culminating bootcamp event. Moreover, funding will be used for transportation to the local deployment site, lodging and meals for the participating students and faculty during the bootcamp. Funding is finally requested to cover the expenses related to hosting meetings for the innovation challenge organizing committee and the presentation of the challenge to the students, as well as promotional and advertising material related to the innovation challenge.
Supporting Documentaiton
Panagiotis Artemiadis, Associate Professor and MSR Graduate Program Director
Lead Organizer
Mechanical Engineering
2/17/20
Graduate Internship Employer Recognition Dinner
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

Lerner Career Services offers MBA and specialized Master’s students the opportunity to participate in an elite Graduate Internship Program (GIP). Each semester, 20-25 students work on special projects with regional employers where they can apply the concepts they learn in the classroom, make important professional connections, build their resume, and be considered for full time jobs after graduation.

Participating GIP employers include Applied Chemical Engineering Barclay Bank, Christiana Care, Chemours, Phillips Cohen, Sallie Mae, and the University of Delaware, among others.  Many of these employers have been engaged in the program for years, hired their interns, and sponsored Lerner international graduates.

In general, our communication with the employers has been somewhat limited to the recruiting process which doesn’t give us the opportunity to learn more about their needs and strengthen the overall relationship/partnership. Therefore, we are planning an Employer Appreciation and Networking Dinner as a way of deepening our connections with the employer leaders who are champions of this program and to create space for communication of program news highlighting UD’s innovations, and informal interaction between Lerner staff and all of this year’s GIP employers and student interns.

Timeline:

The event is planned for May 6th, 2020.

Importance:

It’s our belief that a networking dinner will give us a chance to:

  1. Recognize and celebrate employer engagement and support of UD while fostering more meaningful interactions with Lerner staff and cement important relationships.
  2. Provide our graduate interns with a hands-on opportunity to practice their networking skills and talk about their studies and their work in an environment that mimics what they can expect to encounter as working professionals.

Target Audience:

Graduate Internship Program Employers and Lerner Graduate Interns, along with key staff and university representatives.  Approximately 50 people total.

Total:
Excel
Justification: We’ve heard from employers that our competition (Drexel, Temple) is gathering employers who engage graduate interns on a regular basis. We want this event to reinforce the idea that the University of Delaware is the institution of choice for graduate talent by providing an exceptional and meaningful experience.
Sarah Andrus, Assistant Director

Lerner Career Services
2/21/20
Quantum Science and Engineering
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

We propose to start a graduate program in Quantum Science and Engineering (QSE). QSE has become increasingly important as a foundation of next-generation device technologies for applications including sensing, modeling, computing, and secure communication. Many major corporations and smaller startups have launched quantum information initiatives, but they face a major talent shortage. Realizing large, scalable, and robust quantum systems requires collaborative interactions between experts in a wide range of fields. The QSE graduate program proposed here would be among the first in the world, which would help UD to secure its position as a leader in QSE.

 

In Spring 2019, with support from the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies, we brought in representatives from companies engaged in QSE for a workshop to better understand their needs. They clearly expressed that they have a difficult time hiring people with the requisite knowledge and skills. All representatives were excited about our proposed program and stated that our students would be a good fit at their companies. We also commissioned a market survey with the help of the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. The market survey indicated that industry demand for people with QSE training existed both nationally and in the mid-Atlantic, and that we can expect this demand to continue to grow in the next 5-10 years. Taken together, our research indicates that there is an urgent and growing demand for students trained in QSE, which UD is ideally positioned to fill.

 

One of the benefits of launching a new program is the ability to build in best practices from the beginning. For the Curriculum Innovations grant, we are proposing to do two things: 1) hold a series of course design workshops led by Dr. Amy Trauth from UD’s Professional Development Center for Educators (CEHD) and 2) bring in the Center for Improvement in Mentored Experiences in Research (CIMER) team to provide mentoring training to the QSE faculty. Dr. Trauth will guide the faculty through a rigorous course design process. This will include writing a list of program goals and outcomes, constructing syllabi and assessment tools for each QSE course, mapping course outcomes to program goals, and training the faculty in active and problem-based learning techniques tailored to the QSE classes. Dr. Trauth will also design and implement assessment tools to determine the effectiveness of this training. CIMER will host a two-day workshop devoted to training faculty in effective mentoring.

Timeline:

The course design workshops will take place on four days spaced over AY 20-21. This strategy is informed by research that suggests faculty need multiple institutionally-embedded, time-separated exposures to new instructional methods to incorporate them into their teaching. Between workshop sessions, faculty will prepare materials such as project-based activities or potential methods of assessment. At the next workshop, these products will be collaboratively reviewed and faculty will receive feedback. These workshops will culminate in a curricula review in Summer 2021, allowing faculty to make final revisions to the courses. The CIMER workshop will take place in Fall 2020.

Importance:

With a brand-new program like QSE, there are no existing curricula for the faculty to adapt. The course design workshops will enable the QSE program to have a coherent set of courses that build on each other and address program goals while implementing best practices in teaching and assessment. We expect that our program will serve as a model for other QSE programs, allowing UD to show leadership in this field. The focus on mentoring training will allow all students to have a positive experience in the QSE program, helping to improve diversity and retention.

Target Audience:

The target audience for this grant is faculty participating in the QSE program. We currently have 27 faculty from 8 traditional departments (CIS, CIEG, MATH, PHYS, CHEM, MSEG, ELEG, MEEG) who have agreed to participate in these workshops as a condition for supervising QSE graduate students. We anticipate that the impact of these workshops will go beyond the QSE program, as these faculty will be able to use the techniques they learned in other classes and when mentoring non-QSE students.

Total:
Excel
Justification: We budget $21,291 for 1.5 months of Dr. Trauth’s time (salary plus fringe) to develop and run the course design workshops as well as to develop and deploy a tool to assess their effectiveness. This number includes 5% time of a CTAL member to support Dr. Trauth and help adapt their course design institute for the QSE program. We budget $15,200 for the CIMER workshop. We budget $3,000 for room rental and food for the four curriculum development workshops and the 2-day CIMER workshop.
Supporting Documentaiton
Stephanie Law, Assistant Professor

Materials Science and Engineering
Amy Trauth, Senior Associate Director

Professional Development Center for Educators
Matthew Doty, Professor

Materials Science and Engineering
3/3/20
Women and Gender Studies (WGS) Graduate Certificate 2020-2021 AY Launch
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

The newly approved Women and Gender Studies (WGS) Graduate Certificate fills a curricular gap in graduate education and responds to a growing demand for training in the interdisciplinary, transnational, and intersectional study of feminism, women, gender, masculinity, and sexuality. Despite interest from graduate students in eight departments across three colleges, students previously relied on independent studies for mastery of these areas, especially as they relate to nationality, ethnicity, health, disability, race, religion, and social class. This launch proposal requests funding for the Certificate’s inaugural year program including two planning meetings and a series of three visits by nationally recognized women of color scholars.

 

The Certificate, which includes 3 graduate seminars and a non-credit “Milestone,” supports diversity throughout the university curriculum and meets the needs of graduate students interested in pursuing a training that complements their primary field. The training will give students a competitive edge on the job market through their innovative research agendas and ability to facilitate cross-disciplinary conversation.

 

The Certificate launch will build a research community that deepens graduate training and networking, connects graduate students, postdocs, and faculty across departments and colleges, and nurtures a sustained scholarly exchange, thereby enriching the research agendas and collaborative opportunities for all involved.

 

Certificate learning outcomes support the strategic goals of “building an environment of inclusive excellence” and “strengthening interdisciplinary and global programs.”

  1. Develop and refine analytical and conceptual skills in the study of women, gender, sexuality, masculinity and feminism.
  2. Understand key feminist genealogies and theoretical debates.
  3. Hone ability to critically assess and expand disciplinary paradigms.
  4. Gain proficiency in formulating an interdisciplinary research question and research design.
  5. Gain proficiency in communicating across disciplines and explaining methodological pluralism.
  6. Comprehend and critically assess systemic, historic, and structural power relations in the study of women, gender, sexuality, masculinity and feminism.
  7. Develop the capacity to participate in and facilitate collaborative and non-hierarchical working groups.
  8. Develop pedagogical approaches that support critical analysis.

 

Partnering departments will advise interested graduate students about the Certificate; encourage students to enroll in WGS Graduate Courses; and create curricular space for MA or PhD students to complete the Certificate within their plan for degree completion.

  • Communications
  • Geography
  • History
  • English
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Languages, Literature and Culture
  • Linguistics and Cognitive Science
  • Nursing

 

We continue to develop new departmental partnerships and work closely with graduate directors in partnering departments, and UD advance, to launch the first seminar (spring 2021).

Timeline:

FA20:

-Marketing and outreach with CAS Communications Office.

-Two half-day program development meetings with partner departments. This interdisciplinary exchange will shape core course content, including theories, epistemologies, methodologies and pedagogies.

SP21:

-WOMS 604 core seminar

– Host a series of three nationally recognized women of color scholars whose work bridges the interdisciplinary interests of partner departments with a focus on gender and sexuality. Each scholar will take part in a two day program including:

  • Core seminar participation
  • A scholarly talk
  • A WGS program development meeting
  • Graduate student mentoring sessions
  • A pedagogy workshop open to graduate students, postdocs, and faculty

Importance:

The launch program maximizes the Certificate’s impact across UD and elevates its profile as an institution that provides an interdisciplinary research environment rich with opportunities for faculty, postdocs and graduate students to address pressing problems. The program meetings will strengthen the participation of partnering departments while securing their ongoing investment and commitment to the Certificate. Through a series of invited scholars, the launch will promote a paradigm shifting exchange, demonstrate UD’s redoubled efforts to value women of color’s scholarly excellence, offer graduate students mentoring and networking opportunities, disseminate pedagogical insights, and establish best practices for the success of the Certificate.

Target Audience:

309 current graduate students in eight departments comprise the target audience. The launch program will increase recognition on campus and nationally, distinguishing our Certificate among regional competitor universities. The unique opportunity of working with the WGS faculty, who advise graduate students nationally and internationally, will draw new populations of students. The faculty will outreach to their colleagues and recruit top prospective students. The certificate launch coincides with the establishment of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Gender Based Violence. Collectively these initiatives will boost the national and international appeal for graduate training, thereby increasing enrollment and tuition revenue.

Total:
Excel
Justification: SP21 buyout: Program/course development, recruiting/mentoring, developing partners, oversee scholar series implementation/ assessment, marketing
Pascha Bueno-Hansen Bueno-Hansen, Associate Professor
Lead Organizer
Women and Gender Studies
Robin Andreasen, Associate Professor and UD ADVANCE Co-PI
Co-Organizer
Linguistics and Cognitive Science
Emily Davis, Associate Professor
Co-Organizer
English
Kara Ellerby, Associate Professor
Co-Organizer
Political Science and International Relations
3/20/20
Energy professional development & Newark Energy Treasure Hunt Challenge:
Professional Development
Description:

The energy sector is central to both national and global efforts to combat climate change (IEA,2020). Energy efficiency in buildings provides the cheapest and most cost-effective solution to reducing green house gas emissions from the energy sector in any given urban environment. Studies show that the buildings sector accounts for about 76% of electricity use and 40% of all U.S. primary energy use and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, making it essential to reduce energy consumption in buildings in order to meet national and international energy and climate change challenges as well as reducing the costs of energy building owners and tenants (DoE, 2020).

Opportunities for improved efficiency are enormous however there are not enough training energy professionals to provide the required energy efficiency services. By 2030 building energy use could be cut more than 20% using technologies known to be cost effective today. Within a COVID19 context, energy efficiency and the need to rebuild greener and more resilient economic systems will be central to any immediate and long-term economic recovery plans. As part of previous support from UD Horn Program, we have developed tools for remote energy audits that will be deployed and tested as part of this program. In addition, we have also concluded the “Greenest Blue Hen Challenge” a 3 weeklong challenge for personal sustainability action (on greener energy, waste and food) and which attracted 44 UD students (3/4 graduate students). This UD has a thriving graduate student community willing to participate in this proposed venture.

This proposed professional development will provide five (5) University of Delaware (UD) Graduate Students with practical skills development and industry exposure to energy efficiency project management and innovations. The initiative will provide the 5 graduate students with “Certified Energy Manager” credentials through an online training administered by the American Society of Energy Engineers (AEE). This is a key industry requirement for energy sector professionals. In addition, once the students have completed the training, they will undertake free of charge energy efficiency audits for at least 20 buildings and facilities within Newark Municipality by way of an Energy Treasure Hunt challenge. Discussions have been initiated with key stakeholders including New Castle County, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Energy Star and Energize Delaware in support of this initiative.

Timeline:

This venture is expected to take place between May – September 2020.

Importance:

This is important from largely two major perspectives; first, the initiative provides the UD graduate students with a much sought-after professional development opportunity to acquire and improve practical skills in energy-efficiency project management which benefit them throughout their lifelong careers.  Secondly, energy efficiency provides a major opportunity for economic recovery post-COVID19 as it provides high returns with low costs to many public and private actors seeking to lower their energy costs. The EPA (2020) estimates that energy efficiency measures can save 30-40% of their energy costs with zero to low cost investment by undertaking energy efficiency assessment. UD graduate students providing these energy efficiency services as part of their professional development to public and private actors in Newark will be a significant contribution to enabling a greener and more sustainable economic recovery in our neighborhood. Secondly, this proposed intervention increases the employability of UD graduate students as well as their graduate experience at University of Delaware.

Target Audience:

The major target audience here will be UD graduate students; as well as Newark public and private institutions including public and private schools, main-street small businesses, Newark Municipality and Newcastle County public buildings. We have already initiated discussions with Newark Small business community and Newcastle County Executive Director and have identified an expressed demand for additional energy efficiency services as part of the economic recovery plan amidst the ongoing Covid19 pandemic.

Total:
Excel
Justification: We are seeking $38,000 to accomplish this important energy professional development opportunity and Newark Energy Treasure hunt initiative
Supporting Documentaiton
Robert Ddamulira, Mr.
Lead Organizer
Energy and Environment
4/29/20
Minerals, Materials and Society ONLINE Graduate Certificate – An Innovative Opportunity for International Recruitment
Program Development and Innovation
Description:

The importance of international online student clientele is a valuable growth area for UD. Through existing networks of the Minerals, Materials and Society program with partners in Australia, Russia and China, and the United Nations International Resource Panel, the College of Earth Ocean and Environment has determined that an online platform is opportune for the delivery of this new graduate certificate program.

Through this innovation grant we’ll build on the leadership shown by our program manager Patricia Syvrud (former director of the World Diamond Council and Consultant to Smithsonian’s National Gem Collection) in developing relationships with international partners to transition our courses online and create a coordinated online marketing strategy.

The innovative feature of our program will be to offer online courses which will combine field videos and lectures in an engaging setting which our program prototyped through our Sustainable Gemstones hub (funded by the Tiffany & Co. Foundation until 2018).

The MMS program launched with an initial cohort of 11 students in an MMS Study Abroad program in Australia, January 2020; has 6 students enrolled in the University of Queensland partner Spring 2020 online course, and two undergraduate students enrolled in the MMS graduate certificate program.

UD courses for the MMS graduate certificate are 1 credit, one week, on campus ‘short courses’ being taught during Winter and Summer sessions. Moving all MMS-related courses online will succeed in doing the following: respond to the unfolding coronavirus situation; appeal to a cohort of prospective mid-career professionals whom have requested a full online program in order to apply; and allow UD students to obtain the MMS graduate certificate as an ‘add on’ to their undergraduate degree.

Support will be used to fund the existing MMS program manager position and marketing efforts through the end of December 2020, with support from the Department of Geography and Data Science Institute. This position will be responsible for building consensus among faculty; supporting faculty to enable remote/online presentations; prioritizing the rollout of MMS-related online courses; and shepherding the process through appropriate channels of the Department of Geography, Graduate College, and Office of Professional and Continuing Studies.

It’s critical to fund the position at this juncture, as the MMS program manager has experience in working with our online education partners in Australia and Office of PCS, and already has a comfortable working relationship with the interdisciplinary MMS Advisory Committee, Graduate College, and MMS-related faculty throughout UD.

Timeline:

The position, which also functions as a support mechanism for new GIS programs in the Department of Geography, is currently funded as a Limited Term Researcher whose funding ends May 31, 2020. A $40,000 grant plus 2+ months matching funds and additional financial support from the Dept. of Geography and Data Science Institute, will fund the position in its entirety from June 1 until the end of December 2020, and fund web-based marketing efforts, allowing a robust rollout of the MMS Online program.

Importance:

By moving the MMS graduate certificate program completely online, we’ll be responding to requests by interested, prospective mid-career professionals (currently numbering 40+) in multiple industries including energy, extractives, jewelry, responsible sourcing, precious metals, etc, and UD undergraduate and graduate students, for a more flexible and self-paced schedule. The current global health crisis is forcing all institutions of higher learning to be nimble in addressing the educational needs of students around the world, and moving this program online will also demonstrate the University of Delaware’s ability to react in a timely manner to the larger issues currently facing higher education.

Target Audience:

The target audience for the new online version of the MMS graduate certificate includes mid-career professionals looking to address supply chain transparency and responsible sourcing issues throughout their supply chains, no matter their physical location while continuing to work full time; current undergraduate students who wish to add this certificate to their degree before graduation; and currently enrolled graduate students who desire the additional accreditation. Taking the MMS program completely online will ensure the flexibility of education delivery currently required by global circumstances and working professionals.

Total:
Excel
Justification: This grant will allow the funding of the existing position from June 1 – December 31, 2020, including two months+ of matching funds from the Department of Geography and Data Science Institute to cover salary, overage and a web-based marketing plan via PCS. PCS handled the marketing launch of the MMS graduate certificate and already has the logistical resources in place to launch the updated program easily and with minimal additional cost.
Supporting Documentaiton
Delphis Levia, Chair, Department of Geography & Spatial Sciences
Co-Organizer
Geography & Spatial Sciences
5/1/20
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